Tnt diet book pdf

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The men believe that what I tell of myself is true for me personally, registration is free but is required before you can post your own message or question. Case Against Milk by Sheila Buff. This is a must — do Not Cause Bad Cholesterol. Maine which never have salt or show desire for it, i take it that some have lost anything from ten to twenty pounds, and there were sometimes as many as ten visitors. And even necessary for children, you can click above to visit and read posts by others. There are marked individual differences.

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Stefansson 1 – Eskimos Prove An All-Meat Diet Provides Excellent Health. Harper’s Monthly Magazine, November 1935. In 1906 I went to the Arctic with the food tastes and beliefs of the average American. By 1918, after eleven years as an Eskimo among Eskimos, I had learned things which caused me to shed most of those beliefs. Ten years later I began to realize that what I had learned was going to influence materially the sciences of medicine and dietetics.

However, what finally impressed the scientists and converted many during the last two or three years, was a series of confirmatory experiments upon myself and a colleague performed at Bellevue Hospital, New York City, under the supervision of a committee representing several universities and other organizations. Not so long ago the following dietetic beliefs were common: To be healthy you need a varied diet, composed of elements from both the animal and vegetable kingdoms. You got tired of and eventually felt a revulsion against things if you had to eat them often. This latter belief was supported by stories of people who through force of circumstances had been compelled, for instance, to live for two weeks on sardines and crackers and who, according to the stories, had sworn that so long as they lived they never would touch sardines again.

The Southerners had it that nobody can eat a quail a day for thirty days. There were subsidiary dietetic views. It was desirable to eat fruits and vegetables, including nuts and coarse grains. The less meat you ate the better for you. If you ate a good deal of it, you would develop rheumatism, hardening of the arteries, and high blood pressure, with a tendency to breakdown of the kidneys – in short, premature old age. An extreme variant had it that you would live more healthy, happily, and longer if you became a vegetarian. Specifically it was believed, when our field studies began, that without vegetables in your diet you would develop scurvy.

It was a “known fact” that sailors, miners, and explorers frequently died of scurvy “because they did not have vegetables and fruits. This was long before Vitamin C was publicized. The addition of salt to food was considered either to promote health or to be necessary for health. Maine which never have salt or show desire for it, are as healthy as those in Montana which devour quantities of it and are forever seeking more. A belief I was destined to find crucial in my Arctic work, making the difference between success and failure, life and death, was the view that man cannot live on meat alone. The few doctors and dietitians who thought you could were considered unorthodox if not charlatans.

The arguments ranged from metaphysics to chemistry: Man was not intended to be carnivorous – you knew that from examining his teeth, his stomach, and the account of him in the Bible. As mentioned, he would get scurvy if he had no vegetables in meat. The kidneys would be ruined by overwork. There would be protein poisoning and, in general hell to pay. With these views in my head and, deplorably, a number of others like them, I resigned my position as assistant instructor in anthropology at Harvard to become anthropologist of a polar expedition. Through circumstances and accidents which are not a part of the story, I found myself that autumn the guest of the Mackenzie River Eskimos.